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The Messy Politics of Spike Lee’s She’s Gotta Have It | The Atlantic

The second season of the Do the Right Thing director’s Netflix adaptation dials back the romantic drama, but leans into tonally...

The second season of the Do the Right Thing director’s Netflix adaptation dials back the romantic drama, but leans into tonally confused social commentary.

By the end of She’s Gotta Have It’s first season, back in 2017, the show’s effervescent protagonist chose to abandon the three men she’d been dating. Nola Darling, the fictional Brooklyn-based artist who animated Spike Lee’s 1986 film of the same name, had found a new love worth pursuing: the principle of honesty. “That’s why I painted The Three-Headed Monster,” she said in one of her many fourth-wall breaking monologues, referencing the collagelike painting she’d shown the men during a surprise group dinner. “It’s about the truth, and I understand, often, that is the hardest thing to get to—to land at a place where folks can find openness, candor, and frankness amongst each other.”

Featured Image: “She’s Gotta Have It” consistently allows Nola Darling’s insular worldview, which sounds suspiciously more like that of a middle-aged man than that of a young Brooklyn woman, to go unchallenged. DAVID LEE / NETFLIX

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Written by Hannah Giorgis
Hannah Giorgis is a staff writer at The Atlantic, where she covers culture. [The Wriit-created profile was established to offer the proper attribution & credit for the featured Writer. The profile was created by Wriit and does not reflect the Writer’s association with the publication, and may be updated (claimed) by the Writer upon request.] Profile

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