Politics

Everyone Wants to Talk About Reparations. But for How Long? | The Atlantic

The issue makes the occasional blip in the national conversation. Yet in communities that have been fighting inequality for...

The issue makes the occasional blip in the national conversation. Yet in communities that have been fighting inequality for generations, it is more like the steady thumping of a drum.

Callie house was born into slavery in Tennessee in 1861, the year Confederate soldiers attacked Union soldiers at Fort Sumter, South Carolina, and launched a war that vibrates through American history. Her exact birth date, as was the case with many people who were enslaved, was not officially recorded. As the Union army blazed through Tennessee in 1862 and 1863, her family was among those who fled slavery along with the Union’s wave. She would have been about 4 years old when General William T. Sherman, the famed Union general, issued Special Field Order No. 15, which redistributed about 400,000 acres of land to recently freed black families in 40-acre blocks. It was the origin of 40 acres and a mule, and an early example of what reparations for slavery could look like.

[Featured Image: Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey and the journalist Ta-Nehisi Coates were among those who delivered testimony at a House subcommittee hearing on H.R. 40. PABLO MARTINEZ MONSIVAIS / AP]

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Written by Adam Harris
Adam Harris is a staff writer at The Atlantic. [The Wriit-created profile was established to offer the proper attribution & credit for the featured Writer. The profile was created by Wriit and does not reflect the Writer’s association with the publication, and may be updated (claimed) by the Writer upon request.] Profile

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